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The Conscience Rule’s Effective Date is Delayed

 

By: Erin M. Hussey, Esq.

On May 21, 2019, Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published the Final Conscience Rule with an effective date of July 22, 2019, which allows the denial of certain health care services for religious reasons. This rule protects providers, individuals, and other health care entities from having to provide, pay, or refer services such as abortion, sterilization, or assisted suicide. The rule also protects those providers, individuals, and other health care entities from discrimination on the basis of their exercise of conscience in HHS-funded programs. The intent of this rule is to protect religious and moral objections from having to conduct or pay for these services.

This rule also details compliance obligations such as non-retaliation requirements. The Director of HHS’s Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”), Roger Severino, stated the following on that matter:

“This rule ensures that healthcare entities and professionals won’t be bullied out of the health care field because they decline to participate in actions that violate their conscience, including the taking of human life. Protecting conscience and religious freedom not only fosters greater diversity in healthcare, it’s the law.”

Following the publication of the Final Conscience Rule, many lawsuits were filed, including one brought by 23 Democratic states and one brought by the city of San Francisco, and both of those lawsuits essentially argue that the Final Conscience Rule is unconstitutional. As a result of those lawsuits, HHS has now delayed the effective date of the rule until November 22, 2019. With regards to the delayed effective date, the city attorney of San Francisco, Dennis J. Herrera, stated the following:

“We have won this battle – and it was an important one – but the fight is not over. The Trump administration is trying to systematically limit access to critical medical care for women, the LGBTQ community, and other vulnerable patients. We're not going to let that happen. We will continue to stand up for what's right. Hospitals are no place to put personal beliefs above patient care. Refusing treatment to vulnerable patients should not leave anyone with a clear conscience.”

We will be watching to see if the Final Conscience Rule goes into effect on November 22, 2019. This final rule coupled with the proposed rule on Section 1557, which was discussed in our previous blog, will have a major impact on different classes of vulnerable patients.

For more information on the Final Conscience Rule, please see HHS’s fact sheet found here: https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/final-conscience-rule-factsheet.pdf.