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Tales From the Plan: Episode 3 – Direct & To The Point!

In this episode of Empowering Plans – Tales from the Plan, The Phia Group’s VP of Legal Recovery Services discusses his experiences before and after becoming a happy participant in Direct Primary Care.  If you are one of the many people who’ve heard about “DPC” but still wonder how it will be received by the plan participants, tune in.

Click here to check out the podcast!  (Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube and iTunes Channels!)


The Conscience Rule’s Effective Date is Delayed

 

By: Erin M. Hussey, Esq.

On May 21, 2019, Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published the Final Conscience Rule with an effective date of July 22, 2019, which allows the denial of certain health care services for religious reasons. This rule protects providers, individuals, and other health care entities from having to provide, pay, or refer services such as abortion, sterilization, or assisted suicide. The rule also protects those providers, individuals, and other health care entities from discrimination on the basis of their exercise of conscience in HHS-funded programs. The intent of this rule is to protect religious and moral objections from having to conduct or pay for these services.

This rule also details compliance obligations such as non-retaliation requirements. The Director of HHS’s Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”), Roger Severino, stated the following on that matter:

“This rule ensures that healthcare entities and professionals won’t be bullied out of the health care field because they decline to participate in actions that violate their conscience, including the taking of human life. Protecting conscience and religious freedom not only fosters greater diversity in healthcare, it’s the law.”

Following the publication of the Final Conscience Rule, many lawsuits were filed, including one brought by 23 Democratic states and one brought by the city of San Francisco, and both of those lawsuits essentially argue that the Final Conscience Rule is unconstitutional. As a result of those lawsuits, HHS has now delayed the effective date of the rule until November 22, 2019. With regards to the delayed effective date, the city attorney of San Francisco, Dennis J. Herrera, stated the following:

“We have won this battle – and it was an important one – but the fight is not over. The Trump administration is trying to systematically limit access to critical medical care for women, the LGBTQ community, and other vulnerable patients. We're not going to let that happen. We will continue to stand up for what's right. Hospitals are no place to put personal beliefs above patient care. Refusing treatment to vulnerable patients should not leave anyone with a clear conscience.”

We will be watching to see if the Final Conscience Rule goes into effect on November 22, 2019. This final rule coupled with the proposed rule on Section 1557, which was discussed in our previous blog, will have a major impact on different classes of vulnerable patients.

For more information on the Final Conscience Rule, please see HHS’s fact sheet found here: https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/final-conscience-rule-factsheet.pdf.


Tales From the Plan: Episode 2 – Mrs Peck, It’s Cancer…

In this meaningful episode, Ron Peck tells us about his family’s battle against cancer, and lessons we can all learn from their experience.  Health benefits play a role in our health and survival. You can’t afford to miss this one.

Click here to check out the podcast!  (Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube and iTunes Channels!)


Network Contract Drafting: You’re Doin’ It Wrong

By: Jon Jablon, Esq.

Our consulting team recent came across a network agreement that had the interesting nuance of indicating that the provider would bill amounts that were in line with market standards.

Language like that is a killer. There’s no way around it. It’s so ambiguous as to be all but useless when trying to decide which amounts are properly billed. What exactly are the appropriate market standards? Who is empowered to decide that? When the payor and medical provider inevitably have wildly different opinions on that, how can they possibly resolve the matter when the contract language is so infuriatingly unhelpful?

In this example, the provider had unbundled certain charges, and argued that the market did in fact bear that billing methodology, since most private payors such as this one accepted it – and therefore it was proper pursuant to the contract. The plan, however, contended that a large portion of the provider’s business (and a large part of the total local market) was made up of Medicare claims, and CMS guidelines do not bear that type of unbundling – and therefore it was not proper pursuant to the contract.

Due to this tragically-unclear contractual provision, the payor and provider have been forced to either compromise (which neither wants to do), or take it to court (which neither wants to do, either). It’s going to come down to which option the parties hate less.

Another tragic aspect of this story is its moral. The moral of the story should be to make sure you read your contracts and have them reviewed by an expert prior to signing – but as many of us have found out the hard way, it’s not always possible to view a copy of the provider-facing network agreement. If the payor agreement that you sign talks about billing standards, make sure they’re clear and unambiguous; if it doesn’t, try asking to see the provider agreement. The worst anyone can say is no.

Food for thought: if you’re being asked to sign your name to terms that are clearly ambiguous, or terms the other party won’t even show you, maybe that vendor is not the right fit for your business…


Empowering Plans: P70 – Surprise? Balance Bills!

With this episode, the guys define surprise balance billing, discuss movements to curb them (at the State and Federal levels), and harass Pat “The Man” Santos as well.  Stop reading this description and start listening! 

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Everything I Ever Needed to Learn, I learned in Pre-School!

By: Chris Aguiar, Esq.

As the saying goes, many of the basic skills we need to be effective in life are taught to us early. “Use your words” – a common instruction given to young children who are struggling to express themselves or communicate effectively, is an instruction I still use daily – albeit with a slight adjustment.  Especially with matters relating to plan administration, words alone aren’t enough! it’s important to use the correct words to avoid any confusion and ensure that everyone reading the plan understands exactly what you mean! 

A common example we often encounter is the exclusion of benefits incurred while someone is driving under the influence (“DUI”). Some plans use provisions excluding benefits arising from “serious illegal activity” or “felonious activity” and expect those exclusions to operate in a DUI situation.  You might be thinking, “yeah, Chris, a DUI is seriously illegal activity”. While virtually everyone will agree that a DUI is seriously illegal, in the law it may not always be considered a “serious illegal activity”.  Imagine someone is considered to be a very small amount over the limit (e.g. 0.0804) and they crash into a tree only to have an officer determine that they were in fact engaged in a DUI. They were not drastically over the limit, did not injure anyone but themselves, and this was their first offense. Is it conceivable someone might look at these facts and determine that this particular incident did not rise to the level of “serious illegal activity”?  Certainly, the participant seeking to have their benefits paid might believe the activity not to be sufficiently serious, and you can bet their lawyer will fee the same way. Furthermore, based on the facts above, the act would be considered a misdemeanor rather than a felony. It is quite possible neither of the provisions could be upheld!

The point is this – while this issue is not simple enough that a preschooler could handle it, plans can protect themselves by being careful how their provisions are drafted by using words that clearly state their intent. If you intend to exclude benefits when injuries arise while a participant is driving under the influence, ensure the terms of the exclusion clearly state that intent! Understanding the correct words to use is almost always the difference between a valid and invalid denial!


IP Law vs. Drug Prices – Round Two, Fight!

By: Nicholas Bonds, Esq.

Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar’s recent rule requiring drug manufacturers to include the list prices of their drugs in their television ads is being received by big voices in the industry with about as much enthusiasm as you might expect. Although the rule will not take effect until July 9, big-name manufacturers Merck, Eli Lilly, and Amgen, with the Association of National Advertisers in their corner, are suing HHS and Secretary Azar to block the policy on a combination of likelihood of confusion and First Amendment grounds. Lawsuit aside, the HHS rule drew heavy inspiration from trademark law for its design, and the Federal Government continues to look towards the intellectual property framework for ideas to drag drug prices out of the stratosphere.

Representative Elijah Cummings, Chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, has been among those in Congress leading the charge in this battle over drug prices. Representative Cummings and Senator Debbie Stabenow have joined forces to enlist the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to review HHS’s system for managing patent licenses, with a special focus on Gilead Science’s HIV pill. The drug manufacturer relied, to an extent, on taxpayer-funded research to invent this drug, and are now charging rates that puts it out of reach for many desperate patients. Lawmakers like Cummings and Stabenow believe HHS could better enforce the government’s rights to royalties and licenses, and should take pricing into account when granting such valuable licenses.  

Meanwhile, Senators John Cornyn and Richard Blumenthal have introduced the Affordable Prescriptions for Patients (APP) Act, which is designed to empower the Federal Trade Commission to challenge the anti-competitive nature of patent thickets using its antitrust authority. These thickets encircle drugs like Humira and Lantus with dozens of overlapping patents, effectively foreclosing the possibility of generics or biosimilars from giving consumers cheaper alternatives. The bill also takes aim at the practice of pharmaceutical “product hopping,” a practice similarly designed with an eye toward keeping generics out of the market. By tweaking the absorption rate or dosage level of a drug, manufacturers can take advantage of state substitution laws that prohibit pharmacists from offering a generic if the drug is not bioequivalent or therapeutically equivalent. The AAP would deem both patent thicketing and product hopping to be anticompetitive behavior, and could have sweeping implications for patent prosecution and enforcement.

Some lawmakers, however, have jumped in the trenches alongside the pharmaceutical industry and are actively fighting to loosen requirements for securing patents. Senators Thom Tillis and Chris Coons have written a bill, to big pharma’s delight, that would amend Section 101 of the Patent Act to allow patents on products and laws of nature, abstract ides, and other areas of general knowledge – all areas the Supreme Court has previously ruled ineligible for patent protection under the current wording of the Patent Act.

Most on Capitol Hill agree: the drug prices are too damn high. IP law is indelibly embroiled in the battle to bring these prices down, and combatants on both sides are turning to the IP well for any tactical advantage they can find.


No No-fault – Michigan Revamps its Auto Insurance Rules

By: Andrew Silverio, Esq.

Recently, the Michigan Senate passed sweeping legislation in an effort to get their auto insurance rates, which are the highest in the nation, under control.  The main way Michigan aims to accomplish this is by eliminating their requirement that auto insurance policies carry unlimited “Personal Protection Insurance” (commonly referred to elsewhere as “Personal Injury Protection” or “PIP” coverage), which is no-fault first party medical coverage.  Under the old system, with exposure to the carrier being quite literally unlimited, premiums predictably climbed to unsustainable levels.

The new law will require that carriers offer PPI options with $500,000 and $250,000 limits, as well as an unlimited option.  It also allows for a $50,000 limit for policyholders on Medicaid only, and importantly, allows policyholders to waive PPI coverage completely if they have Medicare coverage or “other health or accident coverage” which provides benefits for accident claims.

So, why are we talking about changes to auto insurance laws?  Because policies carrying these new limits will shift liability onto health plans.  In light of the previous availability of unlimited PPI coverage, many self-funded Michigan health plans already exclude charges resulting from auto accidents completely.  Under the new law, this should exclude an individual from waiving PPI, however it’s probably unreasonable to expect individuals to be educated enough or review applicable requirements in enough detail to understand these requirements, or for carriers offering these policies to do the legwork to determine whether an applicant’s health plan actually covers auto accident claims.  So, the end result may be that individuals are left with no coverage at all for auto accident claims.  This means that in addition to making sure that plan language is tight, it’s crucial for employers to educate their employees about health coverage and their responsibility to have other coverage available via auto insurance.

This could also impact how plans who don’t exclude auto claims completely – the approach of quickly paying everything up front without question with the understanding that unlimited PPI coverage is available for reimbursement after the fact is no longer such an appealing option.  No matter what the existing approach to these claims, now is the right time for Michigan employers to reexamine how they handle auto accident claims and coordinate with PPI coverage.


Tales From the Plan: Episode 1 – Putting the Benefit in Benefit Plan with Jennifer McCormick

In our inaugural episode of “Tales from the Plan,” our own Sr. VP of Consulting, Jennifer McCormick, opens up and candidly discusses her own experience as a consumer of healthcare and member of The Phia Group’s health plan.  Jen is brutally honest, and will make you realize that anyone can be taken advantage of, and anyone can take advantage of, our nation’s healthcare system.  This is mandatory listening.

Click here to check out the podcast!  (Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube and iTunes Channels!)


Faces of Phia: Episode 13 – Glutton for Punishment

Amanda Lima celebrates more than 6 years with Phia (most of that time working closely with Adam), by chatting about her time here, the company, and the amazing work she’s doing on our clients’ behalves – delving deeply into matters of excessive and abusive provider billing. This is a topic about which everyone is buzzing, and Amanda has got the dirt!

Click here to check out the podcast!  (Make sure you subscribe to our YouTube and iTunes Channels!)