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Massachusetts on Track to Pass a Significant Cost Containment Bill

By: Brady Bizarro, Esq.

Massachusetts, like Phia, is a cost-containment leader and on the front lines of the battle to contain health care costs. Last month, Massachusetts State Senators proposed a comprehensive reform bill focused on health care cost containment, specifically focusing on prescription drug prices and hospital costs. They, along with the Millbank Memorial Fund, spent the past year looking at what other states have done to try and curb health care costs. This bill was addressed last at the state’s Massachusetts Association of Health Plans (“MAHP”) conference by Senate President Stanley Rosenberg (which I attended). The report’s recommendations reveal that the Commonwealth is moving toward adopting many of the cost-containment strategies we already recommend to our clients, including: increasing the use of alternative payment methodologies, encouraging value-based choice, increasing consumer awareness, and mitigating provider price variation.

Unsurprisingly to our industry, the state identified pharmaceutical drug costs as a significant driver of rising health care costs. The bill empowers state agencies to conduct additional oversight of drug manufacturers and pharmacy benefit managers (“PBMs”). Notably, pharmacists would be required to inform consumers if a prescription’s retail price is less than they would pay through insurance, and to charge them the lower price. Drug manufacturers and PBMs are required to report drug pricing information to the state’s Health Policy Commission (HPC).

With regard to reigning in hospital spending, the bill aims to reduce unwarranted price variation among hospitals, out-of-network billing, and hospital readmissions. The state’s idea is to set the benchmark for readmissions at 20% for 2017-2020 and to disincentive out-of-network billing by establishing an upper limit for the non-contracted commercial rate for both emergency and non-emergency out-of-network services.

The Senate is expected to vote on this bill before the holiday recess begins on November 15th. If the bill passes the upper chamber, the debate would move to the Massachusetts House of Representatives, which could make significant changes. We will be monitoring the progress of this legislation.