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Phia Group Media


Lots of Moving Parts

 

By: Jon Jablon, Esq.

As those of us involved in self-funding know, there are multiple considerations involved in most decisions. Even something as simple as negotiating a pre-payment bill can involve questions such as: (1) Will the stop-loss carrier reimburse the negotiation fees? (2) Will the agreement hold up if the provider or plan changes its mind? (3) Does the TPA incur liability if it enters into the agreement on behalf of the health plan? (4) How should the TPA treat patient responsibility pursuant to the agreement? ...etc.

And that's just pre-payment negotiations, which are generally considered to be very straightforward!

Reference-based pricing is far more complicated than simple, "traditional" pre-payment claim negotiations. Post-payment negotiations of any kind add a layer of complication, but add to that the human factor (i.e. the employee!), and situations tend to be delicate and can quickly become volatile.

All that aside, however, the purpose of this blog post is actually to talk about how stop-loss treats RBP. There are certainly different ways that different carriers view RBP in general - some view it as a boon, yet others as a bane. An issue that comes up across many different carriers, however they may view RBP, is reimbursement and calculation of "Usual and Customary" in the stop-loss policy.

Many carriers define U&C in the "traditional" way, which is often calculated simply as an amount the carrier deems reasonable as the result of an audit. That can be very dangerous to a plan using a PPO, since network rates are almost universally higher than stop-loss carriers' audits of claims - but for an RBP plan, even though payments are lower, something that cannot be ignored is the potential to settle large claims after the initial payment.

If the policy will cover this type of top-up settlement payment (and that's a big "if"), you'll still need to investigate how the policy will treat the allowable amount paid. Many medical providers will not settle claims for amounts less than the amount a stop-loss carrier's conservative auditor deems payable, which can result in denied claims!

As always, the best general advice we can give is that if a health plan incurs a large non-contracted claim that is paid subject to Medicare-based pricing, it may be worth it to discuss the potential outcomes with the carrier, since balance-billing can happen, and the plan may need the carrier's cooperation down the line! Without proactive communication, though, the chance of getting the claim covered by stop-loss diminishes significantly.